How to DVR the Super Bowl Without Cable for Free

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Nick Foles, Super Bowl LII, Eagles vs Patriots Getty

So, you want to turn Super Bowl Sunday into Super Bowl Monday?

Well, you’re in luck. You’re going to need a Sensory Deprivator 5000 to avoid seeing the results, but if you don’t have cable and want to watch the game later, you can do so by signing up for a cable-free TV service, such as Fubo TV (the recommended service to use to DVR the Super Bowl without cable) or Sling TV. While these services allow you to watch live TV channels–including NBC–they also have varying types of DVR functions. And they come with a free 7-day trial, allowing you to DVR the Super Bowl at no cost.

Here’s what you need to know:

FuboTV: NBC (live in the most markets) is included in the “Fubo Premier” channel package. You can sign up for a free 7-day trial, and then you can watch on your computer via the FuboTV website, or on your tablet or streaming device via the FuboTV app.

30 hours of Cloud DVR is included, while you can upgrade to 500 hours for an extra fee per month (you can include this in your free trial). Additionally, FuboTV has a feature called 72-Hour Lookback, which allows you to “replay nearly any game, show or movie that aired in the last 3 days.” This is the recommended service to use to DVR the Super Bowl.

Sling TV: NBC (live in select markets) is included in the “Sling Blue” channel package. You can sign up for a free 7-day trial, and you can then watch on your computer via the Sling TV website, or on your tablet or streaming device via the Sling TV app

50 hours of Cloud DVR can be added to your package for an extra fee per month (you can include this in your free trial). Note that Sling TV does warn that “Cloud DVR functionality is not available on all channels.”


Preview

Perhaps the biggest storyline of the Super Bowl, at least from an X’s and O’s standpoint, is Tom Brady going up against the Eagles defense. Brady, as we’ve learned over the past 10 decades or however long he’s been playing, is a surgeon with the football, capable of picking apart defenses and often saving his best for the biggest moments. The Eagles match that with one of the best defenses in the NFL and are adept at creating pressure (19 QB hits vs. just 17 points allowed in the playoffs thus far), which is necessary to beat Brady.

While that matchup is undeniably important, though, it’s interesting looking at the other side of the ball.

Nick Foles is somewhat of an enigma, but there’s no questioning his play during the postseason. He was efficient against the Falcons, and then he absolutely torched the Minnesota Vikings’ previously stout defense in the NFC Championship, throwing for 352 yards, three touchdowns, zero interceptions and an absurd 10.67 yards per attempt. A month ago, when he was first taking over for the injured Carson Wentz, he looked a bit like a trainwreck. But all of a sudden, he looks like 2013 Nick Foles again.

“It’s his class, character, leadership, command of the huddle, his willingness to do what is asked of him — man, this is just a very good dude,” Eagles right guard Brandon Brooks said. “He puts in the extra time. He’s come back to Philadelphia to finish what he started.’’

The Patriots defense, meanwhile, has allowed just 15.1 points per game since their Week 9 bye, but they did finish 31st in the NFL in yards per pass attempt allowed (5.7), and we’ve seen some of that inconsistency in the playoffs, as Marcus Mariota and Blake Bortles combined to throw for 547 yards, 7.5 yards per attempt, three touchdowns and zero interceptions.

So, the Eagles are fresh off an absolute drubbing of the Vikings and looking great on both sides of the ball, while the Pats have shown some vulnerabilities. Nevertheless, New England is a 4.5-point favorite. That’s what happens when you have Brady and Bill Belichick with two weeks of preparation, but this should still ultimately be an extremely tight Super Bowl matchup.

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