Grand Theft Auto V: PC Mods Are Back (Sort Of)

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After the messy situation unfolded last week when Take-Two announced they were going after the developers of OpenIV, one of the more popular modding tools for Grand Theft Auto V, it caused an uproar by fans and actually caused them to leave nasty reviews for the title on Steam.

OpenIV was hit with a cease and desist letter that would effectively stop the distribution of mods through the platform. On June 23, Rockstar Games, the developer of the Grand Theft Auto series, had discussions with Take-Two, the publisher of Grand Theft Auto V, and came to an agreement to implement mods back into the game. Here is what Rockstar Games has to say:

Rockstar Games believes in reasonable fan creativity, and, in particular, wants creators to showcase their passion for our games. After discussions with Take-Two, Take-Two has agreed that it generally will not take legal action against third-party projects involving Rockstar’s PC games that are single-player, non-commercial, and respect the intellectual property (IP) rights of third parties. This does not apply to (i) multiplayer or online services; (ii) tools, files, libraries, or functions that could be used to impact multiplayer or online services, or (iii) use or importation of other IP (including other Rockstar IP) in the project. This is not a license, and it does not constitute endorsement, approval, or authorization of any third-party project. Take-Two reserves the right to object to any third-party project, or to revise, revoke and/or withdraw this statement at any time in their own discretion. This statement does not constitute a waiver of any rights that Take-Two may have with respect to third-party projects.

While mods are still allowed to be distributed, players still have reason to worry about be taken to court. There is language in the message that gives Take-Two the write to revoke and/or withdraw the statement at any time under their own discretion. This means they can essentially still sue you even if you play by their rules.

The statement indicates Take-Two will instead go after mods that affect GTA Online, and generally not take legal action against the single-player mods. Some modders have found ways to manipulate code within their mods and affect GTA Online, allowing them to cheat and ruin the experience of other players. This could very possibly have been what Take-Two was targeting all along but the message came across so butchered that everyone became upset.

For now, it looks like the mods for the PC version will keep operating as usual until Take-Two tries to pull another fast one.